Elliott Wave InternationalmyEWISocioniomics.Net

Debt of Advanced Economies Near 200-Year High
IMF research says 1930s-style debt defaults are possible

By Bob Stokes
1/17/2014 12:15:00 PM

Many economic observers expect good times ahead despite a historic mountain of debt. Learn what a new International Monetary Fund paper suggests about the economic future, as well as what EWI sees ahead.

Filed Under: CNBC, Conquer the Crash, debt crisis, economic indicators, Elliott wave, great depression, soverign debt crisis

Category: U.S. Economy


The Chart Shows Why European Central Bank Is Losing Fight with Deflation
Greece reports highest deflation since monthly records began – and there is more to the story

By Bob Stokes
12/31/2013 3:45:00 PM

The European Central Bank recently slashed its main refinancing rate, but almost no one wants the virtually free money. See a chart that shows the failure of the ECB's cheap credit policy.

Filed Under: deflation, economic depression, Elliott wave, european central bank, European debt crisis, Greek debt, soverign debt crisis

Category: European Markets


What You Need to Know About Bond Risk Now
Prechter: "You will not be afforded advance warning of loss."

By Bob Stokes
9/4/2013 5:15:00 PM

In Conquer the Crash, Robert Prechter wrote, "Bonds rated AAA or BBB at the start of a depression generally do not keep those ratings throughout it. Many go straight to D and then become de-listed because of default." Learn why the information in that quote is important to know now.

Filed Under: Conquer the Crash, Elliott wave, great depression, history, municipal bonds, Robert Prechter, soverign debt crisis, Treasury bonds, treasury yields

Category: Interest Rates


No Time to Play Ostrich About Europe’s Economy
The U.S. might want to pay attention to the EU’s persistent economic contraction

By Bob Stokes
6/28/2013 5:15:00 PM

European deflation has arrived in the U.S. before. So, it’s worth asking the question: Is history set to repeat? Consider what has been happening recently in the European Union and the United States.

Filed Under: debt crisis, deflation, economic indicators, Elliott wave, European Union (EU), eurozone, great depression, history, soverign debt crisis

Category: U.S. Economy


Prechter: "I'd Love to Turn Long-Term Bullish Again"
The next buying opportunity is going to be the one of a lifetime.

By Bob Stokes
4/17/2013 4:45:00 PM

Hindsight shows that Robert Prechter's August 1983 then-radical forecast of a "once-in-a-generation money-making opportunity" did happen. Yet that was a two-part forecast, so this question remains: Is the "biggest financial catastrophe" that Prechter foresaw still unfolding, or has the Fed confined the damage to the 2007-2009 financial crisis?

Filed Under: all the same market theory, Bear market, bull market, consumer confidence, consumer price index, deflation, Elliott Wave Theorist, Gold, Robert Prechter, soverign debt crisis, U.S. STOCK MARKET, unemployment

Category: Classic Prechter


How to Protect Your Physical Safety in a Bad Economy
What you don't know can hurt you.

By Bob Stokes
4/9/2013 4:45:00 PM

In a time of economic turmoil, what you know can be as important as what you have. Your possessions can decline in value or be lost altogether, but your knowledge cannot be taken away. You can use what you know to protect what you have. Evidence suggests that many Americans fail to grasp this basic truth. Staying ahead of the crowd begins by reading. As for what to read, few topics are as important as protecting your finances and your physical safety -- and that's what can matter most during a severe economic downturn.

Filed Under: Conquer the Crash, deflation, economic depression, Elliott wave, European debt crisis, safe haven, soverign debt crisis, stock indexes

Category: U.S. Economy


Every Big Economic Collapse Has a First Domino
When will the dominoes begin to tumble, or has it already begun?

By Bob Stokes
3/26/2013 4:45:00 PM

Financial history shows that every major credit boom is followed by a credit bust. The latest round of financial headlines remind us that unsustainable debt is crippling Europe. In the U.S., heavy debt burdens have put local and state governments in deep financial trouble. Federal debt rapidly approaches $17 trillion. What will be the first financial domino to fall?

Filed Under: 1929 Stock Market Crash, banks, Ben Bernanke, bloomberg, central banks, debt, economic indicators, Elliott wave, European debt crisis, gross domestic product (GDP), Interest Rates, monetary policy, quantitative easing, Robert Prechter, soverign debt crisis, U.S. Federal Reserve (the Fed)

Category: U.S. Economy


Has the European Central Bank Defeated the Sovereign Debt Crisis Once and For All?
A three-paneled chart reveals whether the critical precondition for recovery, consumer borrowing, is underway in Europe.

By Nico Isaac
3/21/2013 5:15:00 PM

The conventional wisdom would have to agree. Every polled financial pundit from here to the Hellenic Republic insists that – while not totally out of the woods – the worst of the eurozone economic crisis is in the rearview. The universally recognized date for the Continent’s exact turning point is July 2012. That’s when European Central Bank President Mario Draghi tossed his tie over his shoulder to verbally put the naysayers in their place

Filed Under: central banks, debt crisis, euro, europe, european central bank, European debt crisis, european markets, eurozone, liquidity, soverign debt crisis

Category: European Markets


In 1929, Deflation Started in Europe Before Overtaking the U.S.
What Happens in Europe Will Not Stay in Europe

By Bob Stokes
10/9/2012 5:45:00 PM

An economic downturn in one major area of the globe is likely to affect another. In fact, even during the Great Depression (long before the phrase "global economy"), Europe was exporting to America. But one historic export was not the kind that the U.S. welcomed.
 

Filed Under: 1929 Stock Market Crash, debt, deflation, economic depression, economic indicators, Elliott wave, European debt crisis, European Union (EU), history, soverign debt crisis, world central banks

Category: U.S. Economy


Global Economies and World Financial Markets: How the Big Disconnect Will End
Find out what happens when the two meet

By Bob Stokes
9/5/2012 3:45:00 PM

Will the disconnect between global economies and financial markets continue? EWI believes the answer is "no." Overleveraged financial markets will suffer the fate of overleveraged global economies. Keep in mind: The next financial crisis may start outside of America, so more than ever you need to... 
 
 

Filed Under: all the same market theory, ASX All Ordinaries, Bank of England, Bank of Japan, CAC40, DAX, Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA), economic depression, Elliott wave, emerging markets, euro stoxx 50, europe, european central bank, european markets, financial forecast, Greek debt, Indian markets, market crash, market forecasts, Nasdaq Composite, New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), Nikkei, S&P 500, SENSEX, Shanghai Composite Index, soverign debt crisis, Taiwan index, U.S. STOCK MARKET, world central banks

Category: Global Markets


Deflationary Forces Hard at Work in the United Kingdom
Why Great Britain has "very weak demand" for consumer loans

By Bob Stokes
8/10/2012 2:15:00 PM

So much is uniquely British. But the United Kingdom has at least one thing in common with many other countries: a developing economic deflation. Around the globe, many nations have stagnant economies. In Great Britain, the economy is...
 

Filed Under: Bank of England, Conquer the Crash, deflation, economic depression, economic indicators, Elliott wave, european central bank, european markets, housing prices, soverign debt crisis

Category: European Markets


How to Keep Your Head Above Deflation and Economic Depression
Protect your finances and future during the downward spiral

By Bob Stokes
7/13/2012 3:45:00 PM

As the velocity of money slows, a man known for having plenty of it has just changed his long held upbeat economic tune. On July 12, billionaire Warren Buffet...

Filed Under: Conquer the Crash, debt crisis, deficit, deflation, economic depression, Elliott wave, European debt crisis, housing prices, liquidity, M3 money supply, soverign debt crisis, U.S. Federal Reserve (the Fed)

Category: U.S. Economy


What to Expect During the Coming Debt Collapse
Entire nations will likely default, learn what to do now

By Bob Stokes
7/10/2012 3:30:00 PM

Most of us can grasp how individuals, companies and even municipalities can go bankrupt. It's less easy to conceive how a nation can default on its obligations. But history proves that nation's can default on their debt. Learn what Elliott Wave International expects next...     

Filed Under: Conquer the Crash, credit crisis, debt crisis, debt downgrade, deficit, deflation, economic depression, economic indicators, Elliott Wave Theorist, great depression, Greek debt, history, junk bonds, municipal bonds, soverign debt crisis, U.S. Treasuries

Category: U.S. Economy


The Most Advertised Financial Avalanche of All Time, Yet So Many are Whistling Past the Graveyard
America's banks and the soon to be administered test from across the Atlantic

By Bob Stokes
6/25/2012 5:00:00 PM

Previous summits have not stopped the sovereign debt crisis from escalating, and EWI doesn't see any reason why the next one will either. Meanwhile, demand deposits have been declining at...

Filed Under: banks, Club EWI, deflation, European debt crisis, European Union (EU), eurozone, International Monetary Fund (IMF), safe haven, soverign debt crisis

Category: U.S. Economy


European Debt Crisis: "Imagine the Worst and Double It"
Just how will the sovereign debt crisis end?

By Bob Stokes
6/15/2012 3:00:00 PM

The Italian and Spanish economies are in shambles as borrowing costs have skyrocketed for both countries. And now front and center is Greece. But how about the endgame for the entire European Union?...

Filed Under: credit default swaps, deflation, European debt crisis, European Union (EU), eurozone, Greek debt, soverign debt crisis

Category: Global Markets


"Eerie Echo" of Pre-Lehman: Is Contagion from Europe Coming to the U.S.?
If Greece exits the eurozone the fallout could be "Lehman on steroids."

By Bob Stokes
6/12/2012 4:45:00 PM

As credit risk increases in Europe, the outcome may dwarf the Lehman shock wave. How can you protect your portfolio in a downward spiral of deflation? Every investor needs to know the answer to this question...

Filed Under: banks, Conquer the Crash, credit default swaps, debt crisis, deflation, economic depression, economic indicators, Elliott wave, European debt crisis, eurozone, Lehman Brothers, soverign debt crisis, subprime lending, world central banks

Category: U.S. Economy


The Day of American Austerity: What Will It Look Like?
In the United States, the belt-tightening has just begun

By Bob Stokes
6/11/2012 1:15:00 PM

Ten years ago, Bob Prechter described what this age of austerity would look like. Much of what he described looks just like what is going on today. But how about the rest of what's described in Conquer the Crash? Yes, there's more. You see, Prechter pointed out much more than what unfolded in the 2007-2009 financial crisis. Do yourself the biggest of favors and learn what he has to say...

Filed Under: Bob Prechter, Conquer the Crash, credit crisis, debt crisis, deficit, deflation, economic depression, Elliott wave, Elliott Wave Theorist, European debt crisis, European Union (EU), eurozone, soverign debt crisis

Category: U.S. Economy


Europe's Financial Fiasco: Migrating to the United States?
History may repeat itself

By Bob Stokes
5/29/2012 4:00:00 PM

About a year before the October 1929 crash, net capital inflows fell in several European countries. In other words: European economies began to deteriorate before the Great Depression began in the U.S. Is history repeating itself?...

Filed Under: 1929 Stock Market Crash, Bank of Japan, bloomberg, credit crisis, credit default swaps, debt ceiling, debt downgrade, deflation, Elliott wave, European debt crisis, european markets, European Union (EU), eurozone, financial forecast, great depression, Greek debt, housing prices, recession, Robert Prechter, S&P 500, Shanghai Composite Index, soverign debt crisis

Category: Global Markets


Europe's Financial Flameout: Too Late to Extinguish?
How many European banks will go up in smoke?

By Bob Stokes
5/16/2012 5:30:00 PM

Almost all bank buildings look solid on the outside. But, of course, the goings-on inside are what count. Greece is again in the spotlight, yet we know the financial health of other European banks is the bigger question...

Filed Under: banks, Elliott wave, euro stoxx 50, europe, european central bank, European debt crisis, eurozone, Goldman Sachs, soverign debt crisis

Category: European Markets


The Spain Downgrade and Contagion: Just How Much Risk?
Has the threat ratcheted up a notch (or two)?

By Bob Stokes
4/27/2012 4:00:00 PM

Shortly after the fourteenth European debt crisis summit concluded and there was an "extraordinary shift from negativity to optimism," the November 2011 Global Market Perspective flatly said "The current level of unpayable debt is too big to bail." Yet financial journalists and many of the economists they interview have been busy talking about rising markets and recovering economies. Some were even saying that Europe's debt crisis was "under control." It seems not...

Filed Under: debt downgrade, European debt crisis, european markets, European Union (EU), eurozone, Greek debt, International Monetary Fund (IMF), Short Term Update, soverign debt crisis

Category: European Markets



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